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Monday, December 06, 2010

Comments

Titus

Actually, I had always thought that Aslan was among the better of the animals in the BBC series. The beavers and wolves, on the other hand, were dreadful. I was underwhelmed by the Hollywood Lion, the Witch, & the Wardrobe, and have simply passed on the subsequent installments, of which I have not heard good things (including, if I am not greatly mistaken, criticism in these pages).

Mike

I'm curious, does anyone know what "vulgarities" Lewis is referring to in Disney's cartoons? I knoe Tolkien didn't care for them (no doubt not nearly enough geneologies or etymologies for his tastes), but I'm curious what Lewis's objections were. As an aspiring Catholic animator, it's disheartening to hear some of my favorite Catholic authors despised the career I'm attempting to enter (and yes, I know Lewis wasn't Catholic)

Titus

I haven't read Lewis's writings on the matter, but I'll conjecture: the old Disney and Warner Bros. cartoons often relied on slapstick, caricature, dripping sentimentality, or some combination thereof. The result was often quite hilarious, and much better than almost any similar fare today. I think Lewis's criticism was of vulgarity in an older sense of commonness, rather than its more contemporary suggestion of profanity.

Lewis attempted to write stories that, while being for children, were challenging and ennobling. He likely viewed Disney's products as an incompatible form of mindless entertainment.

But that's really just a hunch.

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