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Friday, April 18, 2008

Comments

Randy

I think he needs to use an example. The first sentence is so abstract I have trouble figuring our what he means.

Paul

I liked his speech, but I have to confirm Randy's thought. It would have been nice if he would have addressed some of the specific human rights violations promoted by members of the U.N. (like abortion or embryonic stem cell research, for instance).

padraighh

Here is a nice summary of the opening phrase

'Human rights, then, must be respected as an expression of justice, and not merely because they are enforceable through the will of the legislators.'

oops, I just plagarized the last line.

Mark Brumley

I thought the speech was excellent.

Its purpose was, among other things, to address the "prepolitical moral foundations", as Ratzinger called them in a widely published essay (found in VALUES IN A TIME OF UPHEAVEL), of the political order as they relate to the UN.

The UN, as an entity the purpose of which is to bring government representatives of the various political communities together, should rest on sound ethical principles. The 60th anniversary of the Declaration of Human Rights provides the occasion for looking at what those principles should be. Referring to specific violations of human rights would, it seems to me, have tended to make more difficult the audience's consideration of those basic principles, by drawing their attention to "hot button" issues about which they would likely have passionate convictions.

rd

i agree with mark. you don't want to turn off people's ears by bringing up specific hot topics at the outset. you want to first get people to think about universal moral principles.

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