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Friday, February 01, 2008

Comments

James M

Excellent article. The part about the twisting of the parable of the Pharisee and tax-collector was shocking (a wacky textbook claiming that the Pharisee's prayer was more pleasing to God because the Pharisee was 'at peace' with himself, whereas the tax-collector felt ashamed!)

Msgr. Cormac Burke (having served for years as a judge on the Roman Rota) is a good example of why the Church is called "an expert on humanity".

Mike D'Virgilio

Haven't been able to read the article yet, but I wanted to comment on the 60s. That decade gets a justifiably bad rap, but the intellectual and cultural forces that in effect created the '60s were hundreds of years in the making. I've been reading of late about the French revolution, and the left that came to fruition in America, and elsewhere, was born there. Of course thinkers before that contributed to that hell on earth.

What is interesting is to see how Western intellectual and cultural elites throughout the 19th and 20th Centuries kept this strain of nihilistic moral anarchy alive below the cultural surface, and sometimes not so below. If you read stuff by Gertrude Himmelfarb, Paul Johnson and others you can see that the'60s were no surprise at all. That's what we have to keep in mind as we fight the scourge of cultural relativism today. It was a long time coming, and most likely will be a long time going.

Alcibiades

Good point, Mike. The '60s were a long time coming, predictable since at least the so-called "Enlightenment." Yet this doesn't make the '60s any less repulsive to me, but possibly even more repulsive since they should have seen it coming and thus been on guard against all the nonsense and filth. I'm a modern-day Bazarov: I loathe my father's generation, to a most unhealthy degree.

Alcibiades

Good point, Mike. The '60s were a long time coming, predictable since at least the so-called "Enlightenment." Yet this doesn't make the '60s any less repulsive to me, but possibly even more repulsive since they should have seen it coming and thus been on guard against all the nonsense and filth. I'm a modern-day Bazarov: I loathe my father's generation, to a most unhealthy degree.

Salome

I have heard all too often from parents and prospective parents that their principal wish for their children is that they will grow up to be 'confident'. Jesus, save us!

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