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« Left Coast Madness | Main | Another sign of the Apocalypse? »

Friday, February 18, 2005

Comments

Teresa Polk

There is an excerpt from Prof. Russell Reno's article on Al Kimmel's "Pontifications" blog, with Al Kimmel's thanks to Richard Neuhaus for permission to print it:
http://pontifications.classicalanglican.net/index.php?p=657#comments

Faith

Welcome, and amen!

Ed Peters

Would someone please explain to me what "crossing the Tiber" is supposed to mean? It has absolutely no foundation in theological, historical, or literary circles. "Crossing the Rubicon", yes, that meant something, and everybody back then knew what it meant; same for "crossing the Delaware". Both crossing actions literally conveyed a major choice, because circumstances on one side of the river were clearly different than circumstnaces on the other. But there's NOTHING significantly different about one side of the Tiber as compared to the other. I know, I know, Steve Ray used the phrase as a catchy title for his engrossing conversion story, but now it seems everybody and his brother uses it as a euphemism for "conversion". But I can't possibly mean that, because, as I said, there ain't no difference from one side of the Tiber to the other. Rome (literally and figuratively) lies on both sides of the Tiber! Could we please let this expression just sort of go away? If not, I may be forced into crossing the Huron, and you all know what THAT would mean.

Russ Clark

This Episcopalian exodus to the Catholic Church is very real. Myself, my Mother and two Brothers have made the move. I have had the pleasure of participating in two RCIA programs at a huge Catholic Church, St. Thomas More in Englewood, CO. The Parish has roughly 6500 families. They convert roughly 40 adults & 40 children every Easter and about 10% of every group is ex-Episcopalian. My experience leads my to believe that the only stumbling block is the Pope. (Believe it or not Marian worship isn't a problem) If you can get the potential convert to understand the theological and biblical purpose of the Pope then the battle is won.

Christine

Careful, Russ, no one worships Mary in the Catholic Church! Revering and worshipping are two different things, as are prayer and worship. Yes, we pray to Our Lady and the saints, but that is not the same as adoration and worship. Think of it more like a conversation with a friend when you ask him or her to pray for you.

Walda Gagnon

For poster Faith, Rome may be on both sides of the Tiber but I believe the Vatican (Catholic Church)is alone on one side, therefore you need to "Cross the Tiber" to come in to the catholic Faith

Charles Dennis

Faith...Crossing the Tiber may also be understood as the one performing the Sign of the Cross, as done in the Catholic Church.

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