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Wednesday, March 17, 2010

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mattw

The idea that this deplorable behavior is okay because it is better than even more deplorable bahvior is absurd and should be dismissed out of hand

The question is only this: did the Pope, who claims infallibilty and is to some extent the most powerful moral authority in the world allow this behavior to continue?

Oh, for the record, the Secretary of Education does not claim infallibility, or claim to be most powerful moral authority in the world.

BobN

The Vatican is headquarters of a UNION???

Union leaders aren't liable for the actions of union members unless, of course, those members are also direct EMPLOYEES of the union.

It may have passed notice, but organizations are held liable for the actions of their employees and, sometimes, CEOs resign.

Carl E. Olson

The idea that this deplorable behavior is okay because it is better than even more deplorable bahvior is absurd and should be dismissed out of hand

Yes, Mattw, it should. Luckily for all involved, that's not what I argued. Perhaps you'd know that if you read my post more carefully.

The question is only this: did the Pope, who claims infallibilty and is to some extent the most powerful moral authority in the world allow this behavior to continue?

Well, that is one legitimate question; there are others. Infallibility, however, has nothing to do with it. In case you didn't know, every single pope, going back to St. Peter, has been a sinner. (Infallibility has to do with the office of the pope in relation to specific teachings on faith and morals; impeccability is the absence of any sin.) Some--not many, but some--popes have been sinners on a fairly dramatic and disgusting scale. The 14th century, for instance, was not too good. Anyhow, one important question is: What did then-Abp. Ratzinger know in the late 1970s/early 1980s about a particular priest and that priest's movements? There is no evidence of wrong-doing on the part of Abp. Ratzinger. But that doesn't seem to stop many in the media and blogdom to render immediate judgment; all that is needed, in their estimation, is the accusation and the mere wisp of a possible connection. Where exactly did the Pope say he the "most powerful moral authority in the world"? Take your time: you'll need it.

Oh, for the record, the Secretary of Education does not claim infallibility, or claim to be most powerful moral authority in the world.

Further proof you either didn't read my post or are incapable of understanding what I wrote. I'll try to make it really simple: If those who are calling for the Pope's heads are really concerned about the molestation of children, then why don't they also spend time looking into the public school system and its many teachers, managers, leaders, directors, and such? Because the evidence overwhelming shows there is far more abuse going on in public schools than in rectories and parishes. And yet little to nothing is being said about or being done in response.

I am all for the removal of abusive priests and for the just punishment of those priests and anyone who covered for them. But I don't think that folks such as Andrew Sullivan are much for calm justice or for being fair with the evidence (or lack of evidence). Got it?

Thomas Mellon

It is the year of the priest so increased attacks on the priesthood,both natural and supernatural, are to be expected.Some senior priests have been naive in facing and stopping the crimes of a small minority of their colleagues and are facing the consequences of that now. But they and we must not continue that naivety by assuming that all the people who are highlighting the weaknesses of members of the church are acting in good faith.Some are hoping that the Pope and the rest of the church will be muted in its challenging of secular humanism and relativism because of this so called crisis.I think they will be surprised.

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