Bookmark and Share
My Photo

FROM the EDITORS:

  • IMPORTANT INFORMATION:
    Opinions expressed on the Insight Scoop weblog are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the positions of Ignatius Press. Links on this weblog to articles do not necessarily imply agreement by the author or by Ignatius Press with the contents of the articles. Links are provided to foster discussion of important issues. Readers should make their own evaluations of the contents of such articles.

NEW & UPCOMING, available from IGNATIUS PRESS

















































































« Health Care and the Common Good | Main | Bishop Joseph Martino to resign? »

Thursday, August 27, 2009

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451b7c369e20120a52752b9970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference The Scriptural Roots of St. Augustine's Spirituality:

Comments

Blake Helgoth

How is it that you missed the fact that the Dominicans follow the rule of St. Augustine and read it in community at least once a week?

Marge

I read somewhere quite a few years about about a passage as follows "love God and do as you like" because if you really love the Lord you will think twice about doing something displeasing to Him. Was his quote from St. Augustine or St. Paul.

LJ

Anyone approaching Scripture from truly "charitable" motives and intentions, needs to have a "pure heart," so that one does not love other "things" but only the Holy Trinity. They also need a "good conscience" lest a bad conscience lead to anxiety, guilt and despair, and so alter one's mental state that they seriously misconstrue the Sacred Texts.

One wonders how many heresies and "scripturally based" tangents have arisen for this very reason. It is human nature to justify ourselves rather than confess our guilt, and if we can do it from Scripture and convince ourselves thoroughly enough, we can then become at very least a dissident, and at worst a schismatic or heretic.

Like many others, I have often thought, considering his early struggles with guilt and perhaps scrupulosity, and his actions much later, that this was at the core of Luther's rebellion. By force of his own momentum it became Sola Fide and Sola Scriptura but I think by his own writings and admissions it all started much as St. Augustine points out.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Ignatius Insight

Twitter


Ignatius Press


Catholic World Report


WORTHY OF ATTENTION:




















Blogs & Sites We Like

September 2014

Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30        
Blog powered by Typepad