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Sunday, November 30, 2008

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Jeff Miller

By the press' logic there are also several popes because there are people around the world who feel they were called to be pope and were validly elected.

Ed Peters

CO wrote: "Why does this rankle me so? Part of it is simply the brazen illogic, self-obsessive bloviation, and disdainful dissent so readily evident in the priestette movement. Their theology is lousy. Their ecclesiology is incoherent."

Pretty good reasons, those.

Dan

I have not read a great deal about the issue of ordination of women, but it occurred to me recently that if the Church were to ordain women it would thereby implicitly condemn Jesus as a sexist. Jesus after all had many women as followers and friends, and yet made none of them apostles.

I do not find credible the claim that a Catholic woman can be called to be a priest rather than a sister. The claim of such a call suggests not only disobedience but also a confusion of the sexes. It also is hard to understand or sympathize with a claimed call that is strictly limited to a form of service that the Church does not recognize, particularly when so many legitimate forms of service exist. The Church through her history has been capacious enough to give berth to the spirituality of a wide variety of great women saints. There is no need to distort the priesthood for women to serve. As some have noted, Mary is higher than Peter.

I am also struck by the fact that the prevalence of women claiming to be called to be priests dates back to roughly the time that Betty Friedan and Gloria Steinem started publishing books. This suggests to me that the call originates from modern feminism rather than from God.

Todd

It can be helpful to confine ourselves to what the Church teaches. It might be said that the name-calling and insults go beyond the Christian approach.

"I am also struck by the fact that the prevalence of women claiming to be called to be priests dates back to roughly the time that Betty Friedan and Gloria Steinem started publishing books."

Saint Therese Lisieux. She started it.

Skyhawk

"Saint Therese Lisieux. She started it."

Are you sure it wasn't Mary Magdalene?

What a bunch of hooey Todd...

Ed S

I really hope, Todd, that your last comment was an attempt to be funny. Definitely, don't quit your day-job.

There's a world of difference between St Therese expressing her deep love of Christ-- saying she desired to be a priest, an apostle, or a martyr for Him--and the priestettes belligerently defying Tradition and the Magisterium to satisfy their ill-conceived and selfish needs.

The allusion to St Therese's quote about wanting to be a priest is out of context here.

Ed Peters

The contempt for law, as a human endeavor, that is being shown by the lawyer Via is breathtaking.

joanne

"Saint Therese Lisieux. She started it."
That's obnoxious and insulting.
St Therese loved the priesthood because she so loved Jesus. She did not, and did not wish to, defy God's holy will. She merely yearned to do all that she could, according to His will, to serve (and BE) Love. Think of a child who, out of love and awe, wants to be everything her father is, no matter that her desires are unrealistic.
She wanted to DIE for Jesus, the Eternal Priest. She wanted Him to be loved and obeyed by all. She wanted to be a missionary, spreading the Gospel all over the world, gathering in the souls Jesus died for. These were the desires of her heart, not an arrogant resume of self-worth.
Women demanding to be ordained detest priests and the Church (this is evident by their actions and their words). How then, do they expect to serve the Church? They have no interest in God's will, but are caught up in serving their own interests.
I am reminded to pray for the humility, obedience, and love we need in order to be recognizable as belonging to the Church.

Ed Peters

Maybe it's me, but I thought Todd's quip was joke. Assuming it was, it does illustrate that humor in comboxes is very tricky thing. So much goes into humor (tone of voice, context, gesture, etc) that can't make it into a blog post. Attempts at humor typically fail in cyberspace. imho.

Of course, maybe Tood really meant it. In which case, dot dot dot.

joanne

Todd, sorry if you were kidding. Ever since Thomas Aquinas was used to promote "choice" I've been touchy. Also, St Therese is the patroness of my parish, so I'm touchy x2.
There are definitely "Catholics" waving Mary Magdalen around as their reason for promoting a female takeover of the priesthood.
Maybe when Catholics become Catholic again I'll regain my sense of humor. Mea culpa.

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